Kendalle-bio | Jason Phillips Nutrition| iN³ Nutrition

Macro Nutrition Coach


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Kendalle Crow

Brief description of your background:

I’m from California but went to school in the South (War Eagle) and spent time hopping around abroad a bit (Holland and England) before coming back to Atlanta. I did my undergrad in Public Relations and loved it, but had some health issues going into college which resulted in having my gallbladder removed. I got really into nutrition at that point but more as a hobby and a couple years after my undergrad decided to go back to school for nutrition and landed on the Bauman College 2 year intensive program for Nutrition Consulting

What were you doing before you started counting macros?

What did I not do? I grew up around a very athletic family and did everything from soccer to gymnastics before focusing on being a dancer for a number of years where I was always told I didn’t have the right body type. I saw girls develop eating disorders and for a while there I wasn’t far off myself. I got healthy and ended up in CrossFit where I ended up coaching for a couple of years – I did the Paleo thing, the 21-day sugar detox thing, the low carb thing, all the things but nothing stuck for long. As I started studying, I realized Paleo didn’t work for high intensity AT ALL and quickly readjusted to eat more carbs for training, eventually gravitating towards macros through word of mouth. 

How has flexible dieting changed your life?

I realized I didn’t have to label foods as good or bad, or “off limits” – I could eat, hit a healthy amount of fiber and if some Justin’s Peanut Butter cups fit I didn’t have to beat myself up or spiral into a cheat meal or cheat day. When I did Paleo and worked out hard in CrossFit my body wanted so much for food, specifically carbs, I was constantly craving things. Once I ate enough to fuel my goals the cravings stopped. I can’t remember the last time I HAD to have something like a craving. Except for maybe tacos (I always want tacos).

What got you involved in the nutrition world and why did you become a coach?

I  got tired of seeing everyone around me – gym members, family, friends, going through vicious cycles of deprivation then “falling off the wagon” and getting nowhere and beating themselves up. 

What is it you love most about helping people?

At some point, everyone accomplishes something they didn’t think they could change, that kind of “is what it is” mentality – that ranges from weight loss to mental shifts in how they think about food, or all of a sudden sleeping through the night and not getting that afternoon crash. At some point, things align and start shifting, and there are small breakthroughs that lead to the bigger picture. 

Best success story from client relationship:

I was working with a new mom who had always chronically under-ate for years and was scared of food. Slowly I got her eating almost 1000 more calories than where she was at. Her metabolism was back, and over the course of eating more food than she ever had in her life, she lost the 10 lbs she’d always wanted to lose. She had a breakthrough moment and told me she could never go back to eating how she did before, and it was the best thing to ever happen to her. So I left her knowing that moving forward she was going to be so much healthier for the rest of her life. 

How do you motivate and inspire people?

I think that has to come from the individual. I can provide tools and some pep talks – but ultimately I try to get people to just be kinder to themselves. Once they treat themselves and talk to themselves like they would a friend and stop nitpicking at everything they see wrong – I tend to find the motivation follows. 

Macro Nutrition Coach


Brief description of your background:

I’m from California but went to school in the South (War Eagle) and spent time hopping around abroad a bit (Holland and England) before coming back to Atlanta. I did my undergrad in Public Relations and loved it, but had some health issues going into college which resulted in having my gallbladder removed. I got really into nutrition at that point but more as a hobby and a couple years after my undergrad decided to go back to school for nutrition and landed on the Bauman College 2 year intensive program for Nutrition Consulting

What were you doing before you started counting macros?

What did I not do? I grew up around a very athletic family and did everything from soccer to gymnastics before focusing on being a dancer for a number of years where I was always told I didn’t have the right body type. I saw girls develop eating disorders and for a while there I wasn’t far off myself. I got healthy and ended up in CrossFit where I ended up coaching for a couple of years – I did the Paleo thing, the 21-day sugar detox thing, the low carb thing, all the things but nothing stuck for long. As I started studying, I realized Paleo didn’t work for high intensity AT ALL and quickly readjusted to eat more carbs for training, eventually gravitating towards macros through word of mouth. 

How has flexible dieting changed your life?

I realized I didn’t have to label foods as good or bad, or “off limits” – I could eat, hit a healthy amount of fiber and if some Justin’s Peanut Butter cups fit I didn’t have to beat myself up or spiral into a cheat meal or cheat day. When I did Paleo and worked out hard in CrossFit my body wanted so much for food, specifically carbs, I was constantly craving things. Once I ate enough to fuel my goals the cravings stopped. I can’t remember the last time I HAD to have something like a craving. Except for maybe tacos (I always want tacos).

What got you involved in the nutrition world and why did you become a coach?

I  got tired of seeing everyone around me – gym members, family, friends, going through vicious cycles of deprivation then “falling off the wagon” and getting nowhere and beating themselves up. 

What is it you love most about helping people?

At some point, everyone accomplishes something they didn’t think they could change, that kind of “is what it is” mentality – that ranges from weight loss to mental shifts in how they think about food, or all of a sudden sleeping through the night and not getting that afternoon crash. At some point, things align and start shifting, and there are small breakthroughs that lead to the bigger picture. 

Best success story from client relationship:

I was working with a new mom who had always chronically under-ate for years and was scared of food. Slowly I got her eating almost 1000 more calories than where she was at. Her metabolism was back, and over the course of eating more food than she ever had in her life, she lost the 10 lbs she’d always wanted to lose. She had a breakthrough moment and told me she could never go back to eating how she did before, and it was the best thing to ever happen to her. So I left her knowing that moving forward she was going to be so much healthier for the rest of her life. 

How do you motivate and inspire people?

I think that has to come from the individual. I can provide tools and some pep talks – but ultimately I try to get people to just be kinder to themselves. Once they treat themselves and talk to themselves like they would a friend and stop nitpicking at everything they see wrong – I tend to find the motivation follows.