Jerica Moore-Bio | Jason Phillips Nutrition| iN³ Nutrition

Macro Nutrition Coach


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Jerica Moore

Brief description of your background:

A little bit about me – I am a Florida native, born and raised in Sebring (if you’ve never heard of it I’m sure your grandparents have). I went to undergrad starting at Belmont University in Nashville pursuing the music career, but shortly after transferred to Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, FL graduating with a B.S. in Athletic Training. I was offered a graduate assistantship at East Tennessee State University working as the athletic trainer for the Men’s and Women’s tennis teams where I studied and graduated with a M.A. in Kinesiology and Sport Studies. 7 years of school later and I’m here…whew! I did clinic rotations all throughout my 4 years at PBAU ranging from high school sports to 2 years with DII baseball to my senior internship at Florida Atlantic University working DI Football.

What were you doing before you started counting macros?

I never really paid much attention to nutrition (PopTarts and oatmeal cream pies are good, right?) until about 5 years ago, when I started CrossFit. Like everyone else I was introduced to Paleo, Zone, and Cheat Days. Needless to say, a combination of all of those things led to a really unhealthy relationship with food. I did not view food as fuel, I viewed it as something I needed to burn off and everything I put in my mouth was going to make me fat. Looking back now, I know that I was wayyyy under eating (and over eating the bad food on my cheat days) on top of doing CrossFit 2-3 hours/day and school, and clinical rotations…need I go on? During my time at ETSU I took an elective course on Sports Nutrition and everything finally started clicking! The science behind it made sense and totally changed my perspective on food and nutrition.

How has flexible dieting changed your life?

I now view food as empowering. I think the mindset has changed the most for me. I can eat ice cream (my faveeee) and not feel guilty. I only train 4 days/week now and I don’t feel bad about myself. Food and nutrition has become a tool that has helped move me forward both physically and mentally. Most people will view counting macros as a limitation, or something that is too tedious, but I really find it liberating. I felt so much freedom in a more flexible diet than before.

What got you involved in the nutrition world and why did you become a coach?

One of the other athletic trainers I worked with while at ETSU actually introduced me to counting macros, how to manipulate things for a cut, maintenance, or gaining, and periodizing nutrition throughout the training year. He also introduced me to carbs!! (Thanks Nate). From there I was really my own guinea pig for the next year and a half. I read almost ever nutrition book known to man. I got myself to maintenance calories, and then thought “Hey I want to get stronger for CrossFit so let’s gain some weight.” Going from 135 up to almost 150 (not in a good way) was a learning experience! Then the next CrossFit season I decided to cut myself back down, trained at 135 for the whole year, and felt so much better! The take home experience from that was fuel for performance, not a number on a scale! I was so wrapped up in aesthetics, getting bigger, that it got out of hand and my performance dropped. Now, switching sports and doing just weight lifting for performance, I got myself a coach (fellow iN3 coach Cassidy) to help me through this new process so I don’t make similar mistakes and can learn more to help other people.

So getting into the coaching world, I really want to help people do things the right way the first time! And not making poor choices like I did. Fueling themselves properly for performance. What feedback you should really be looking for, other than a number on the scale. Building a healthier relationship with food. Finding the freedom that I found.

What is it you love most about helping people?

I love seeing the “ah ha” moment. That one conversation/experience where it finally clicks with a client. I can talk science/reasoning to people until I’m blue in the face, but if they don’t wrap their mind around it and if it never clicks with them no real change is ever going to occur. The “ah ha” moment is when things really start rolling and I get excited!

Best success story from client relationship:

The best news I’ve gotten to date from a client was that she got her REAL period after getting off of hormonal birth control from being on it for 20+ years. That was pretty awesome.

There have been a lot of “ah ha” moments for my clients too, just changing their mindset of how to fuel themselves properly for performance and to stop chasing aesthetics at the same time. Taking a female who was eating 1600 calories/day up to 2300 calories/day now feeling better, sleeping better, more energy, and better performance in the gym… that’s awesome. I don’t think that will ever get old.

How do you motivate and inspire people?

To be honest, I can’t. True motivation comes from within. I can only call people to action. It’s up to them whether or not they take me up on that. I challenge my clients to push themselves outside of their comfort zone because that’s where growth occurs. I will be there for them every step of the way, but it’s up to them to make the choice. To be the ones to motivate themselves. To make lifestyle changes. To make the hard choices. Effort is a choice. I try to remind my clients of that daily.

Macro Nutrition Coach


Brief description of your background:

A little bit about me – I am a Florida native, born and raised in Sebring (if you’ve never heard of it I’m sure your grandparents have). I went to undergrad starting at Belmont University in Nashville pursuing the music career, but shortly after transferred to Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, FL graduating with a B.S. in Athletic Training. I was offered a graduate assistantship at East Tennessee State University working as the athletic trainer for the Men’s and Women’s tennis teams where I studied and graduated with a M.A. in Kinesiology and Sport Studies. 7 years of school later and I’m here…whew! I did clinic rotations all throughout my 4 years at PBAU ranging from high school sports to 2 years with DII baseball to my senior internship at Florida Atlantic University working DI Football.

What were you doing before you started counting macros?

I never really paid much attention to nutrition (PopTarts and oatmeal cream pies are good, right?) until about 5 years ago, when I started CrossFit. Like everyone else I was introduced to Paleo, Zone, and Cheat Days. Needless to say, a combination of all of those things led to a really unhealthy relationship with food. I did not view food as fuel, I viewed it as something I needed to burn off and everything I put in my mouth was going to make me fat. Looking back now, I know that I was wayyyy under eating (and over eating the bad food on my cheat days) on top of doing CrossFit 2-3 hours/day and school, and clinical rotations…need I go on? During my time at ETSU I took an elective course on Sports Nutrition and everything finally started clicking! The science behind it made sense and totally changed my perspective on food and nutrition.

How has flexible dieting changed your life?

I now view food as empowering. I think the mindset has changed the most for me. I can eat ice cream (my faveeee) and not feel guilty. I only train 4 days/week now and I don’t feel bad about myself. Food and nutrition has become a tool that has helped move me forward both physically and mentally. Most people will view counting macros as a limitation, or something that is too tedious, but I really find it liberating. I felt so much freedom in a more flexible diet than before.

What got you involved in the nutrition world and why did you become a coach?

One of the other athletic trainers I worked with while at ETSU actually introduced me to counting macros, how to manipulate things for a cut, maintenance, or gaining, and periodizing nutrition throughout the training year. He also introduced me to carbs!! (Thanks Nate). From there I was really my own guinea pig for the next year and a half. I read almost ever nutrition book known to man. I got myself to maintenance calories, and then thought “Hey I want to get stronger for CrossFit so let’s gain some weight.” Going from 135 up to almost 150 (not in a good way) was a learning experience! Then the next CrossFit season I decided to cut myself back down, trained at 135 for the whole year, and felt so much better! The take home experience from that was fuel for performance, not a number on a scale! I was so wrapped up in aesthetics, getting bigger, that it got out of hand and my performance dropped. Now, switching sports and doing just weight lifting for performance, I got myself a coach (fellow iN3 coach Cassidy) to help me through this new process so I don’t make similar mistakes and can learn more to help other people.
So getting into the coaching world, I really want to help people do things the right way the first time! And not making poor choices like I did. Fueling themselves properly for performance. What feedback you should really be looking for, other than a number on the scale. Building a healthier relationship with food. Finding the freedom that I found.

What is it you love most about helping people?

I love seeing the “ah ha” moment. That one conversation/experience where it finally clicks with a client. I can talk science/reasoning to people until I’m blue in the face, but if they don’t wrap their mind around it and if it never clicks with them no real change is ever going to occur. The “ah ha” moment is when things really start rolling and I get excited!

Best success story from client relationship:

The best news I’ve gotten to date from a client was that she got her REAL period after getting off of hormonal birth control from being on it for 20+ years. That was pretty awesome.

There have been a lot of “ah ha” moments for my clients too, just changing their mindset of how to fuel themselves properly for performance and to stop chasing aesthetics at the same time. Taking a female who was eating 1600 calories/day up to 2300 calories/day now feeling better, sleeping better, more energy, and better performance in the gym…. that’s awesome. I don’t think that will ever get old.

How do you motivate and inspire people?

To be honest, I can’t. True motivation comes from within. I can only call people to action. It’s up to them whether or not they take me up on that. I challenge my clients to push themselves outside of their comfort zone because that’s where growth occurs. I will be there for them every step of the way, but it’s up to them to make the choice. To be the ones to motivate themselves. To make lifestyle changes. To make the hard choices. Effort is a choice. I try to remind my clients of that daily.