Macro Nutrition Coach


Want to work with Heather ?

Heather McBride

I am a born and raised Houstonian! I graduated Magna Cum Laude in December of 2017 with my Bachelors of Science in Human Nutrition and Foods ACEND Track from the University of Houston (GO COOGS!). I have been an athlete my entire life and competed in swimming and softball for close to 14 years. A year into college I found CrossFit and fell in love with the barbell. After 2 years of CrossFit I transitioned over to Olympic Weightlifting and haven’t looked back. I am a 3 time University and Under 25 National competitor. I currently help fellow weight lifters make weight for competition and mend their relationship with food.

What were you doing before you started counting macros?

Starving. I developed an eating disorder during high school and had no idea what I was doing. I fell into the classic restrict and binge pattern for several years until I found counting macros.

How has flexible dieting changed your life?

During my eating disorder I demonized a lot of foods and food groups. Flexible dieting has lifted the ban on all the foods I once considered “bad”. Flexible dieting has also helped me conquer the fear of social situations with food; I stopped being afraid to go to restaurants with friends and family and put memories first. I now eat more than ever before and have my best relationship with food.

What got you involved in the nutrition world and why did you become a coach?

During my junior year of high school I found myself in a mentally abusive relationship and developed an eating disorder and body dysmorphia. My eating disorder took on many forms over the years from anorexia to orthorexia to binging. After years of all the many stages I began researching nutrition and self-taught myself about the fundamentals. I fell in love with nutrition after that. I learned all about the importance of each macronutrient for health and performance. When I entered college I knew what I wanted to pursue and got a degree in nutrition. In weight class sports and the general population there are a lot of individuals with disordered eating and body dysmorphia. I became a coach because I never want anyone to have to go through what I did and if someone has I want to help them come out on the other side happier, stronger, and on track to reach their goals.

What is it you love most about helping people?

I love to educate people and see them apply the information. As coaches I believe it is our job to motivate, inspire, and teach people about nutrition so they will not need us forever. I love when I get texts and emails about successes clients have had using their new nutrition knowledge and the impact they have had on others. Nutrition is so impactful and each person I can help will reach another 10. It is so exciting to watch nutrition knowledge spread.

Best success story from client relationship:

One of my current weightlifting clients worked with a local nutritionist in Houston to make weight for Nationals in 2017. She made weight after being on a very strict keto diet but unfortunately she was unable to compete because she passed out from dehydration. After firing her last nutritionist for putting her health at risk I began to work with her. No matter how strict she was her body weight wouldn’t move and she couldn’t compete in her ideal weight class. I encouraged her to get off keto, begin a reverse diet, and put competing on the back burner. As the calories went up and training frequency went down her weight also started to cooperate. After a year of working together she is now back on track to compete at AO Finals at her desired weight class getting to eat more than ever before while enjoying time with family and friends and putting up some big numbers.

How do you motivate and inspire people?

I motivate people by being vulnerable with clients and encouraging them to do the same. I have high and low days and I share these with them. As a society we get so caught up on the images and stories that portray “perfect” lives. I want people to feel their emotions and embrace that it is okay to not have a good day, get in a fight with your spouse, or not feel good in your skin! I love having people reach out when they are having an off day so I can remind them that it is perfectly normal and provide them ways to deal with the issues in a constructive way like journaling.

Macro Nutrition Coach


I am a born and raised Houstonian! I graduated Magna Cum Laude in December of 2017 with my Bachelors of Science in Human Nutrition and Foods ACEND Track from the University of Houston (GO COOGS!). I have been an athlete my entire life and competed in swimming and softball for close to 14 years. A year into college I found CrossFit and fell in love with the barbell. After 2 years of CrossFit I transitioned over to Olympic Weightlifting and haven’t looked back. I am a 3 time University and Under 25 National competitor. I currently help fellow weight lifters make weight for competition and mend their relationship with food.

What were you doing before you started counting macros?

Starving. I developed an eating disorder during high school and had no idea what I was doing. I fell into the classic restrict and binge pattern for several years until I found counting macros.

How has flexible dieting changed your life?

During my eating disorder I demonized a lot of foods and food groups. Flexible dieting has lifted the ban on all the foods I once considered “bad”. Flexible dieting has also helped me conquer the fear of social situations with food; I stopped being afraid to go to restaurants with friends and family and put memories first. I now eat more than ever before and have my best relationship with food.

What got you involved in the nutrition world and why did you become a coach?

During my junior year of high school I found myself in a mentally abusive relationship and developed an eating disorder and body dysmorphia. My eating disorder took on many forms over the years from anorexia to orthorexia to binging. After years of all the many stages I began researching nutrition and self-taught myself about the fundamentals. I fell in love with nutrition after that. I learned all about the importance of each macronutrient for health and performance. When I entered college I knew what I wanted to pursue and got a degree in nutrition. In weight class sports and the general population there are a lot of individuals with disordered eating and body dysmorphia. I became a coach because I never want anyone to have to go through what I did and if someone has I want to help them come out on the other side happier, stronger, and on track to reach their goals.

What is it you love most about helping people?

I love to educate people and see them apply the information. As coaches I believe it is our job to motivate, inspire, and teach people about nutrition so they will not need us forever. I love when I get texts and emails about successes clients have had using their new nutrition knowledge and the impact they have had on others. Nutrition is so impactful and each person I can help will reach another 10. It is so exciting to watch nutrition knowledge spread.

Best success story from client relationship:

One of my current weightlifting clients worked with a local nutritionist in Houston to make weight for Nationals in 2017. She made weight after being on a very strict keto diet but unfortunately she was unable to compete because she passed out from dehydration. After firing her last nutritionist for putting her health at risk I began to work with her. No matter how strict she was her body weight wouldn’t move and she couldn’t compete in her ideal weight class. I encouraged her to get off keto, begin a reverse diet, and put competing on the back burner. As the calories went up and training frequency went down her weight also started to cooperate. After a year of working together she is now back on track to compete at AO Finals at her desired weight class getting to eat more than ever before while enjoying time with family and friends and putting up some big numbers.

How do you motivate and inspire people?

I motivate people by being vulnerable with clients and encouraging them to do the same. I have high and low days and I share these with them. As a society we get so caught up on the images and stories that portray “perfect” lives. I want people to feel their emotions and embrace that it is okay to not have a good day, get in a fight with your spouse, or not feel good in your skin! I love having people reach out when they are having an off day so I can remind them that it is perfectly normal and provide them ways to deal with the issues in a constructive way like journaling.